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Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers have joined with leading scientists worldwide in a collaborative effort to pursue a massive energy reserve that, by itself, could keep America powered into the next century. Ice-like gas hydrate trapped within rock deep below the Earth's surface may hold promise for new energy resources.

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Document Title: Gas Hydrate (Methane Gas)
Category: Energy Production and Conservation
Media Type: Photos
Date of Image/Photo: October 2001
Background: The ice-like substance called gas hydrate (methane gas) is trapped within rock three-quarters of a mile below Alaska and Canada's frozen tundra, and in offshore locations scattered around America's coastline. In early 2002, PNNL researchers will obtain frozen core samples from the MacKenzie Delta in Canada that contain methane gas. These "rock gas" samples from the Mallik Research Well may unlock clues to future U.S. energy independence if a safe and economical harvesting process can be perfected.
URL of this page: http://picturethis.pnl.gov/picturet.nsf/by+id/AMER-53KTZG

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