Skip to Main Content U.S. Department of Energy
PictureThis

Nicknamed "fast glass," a more efficient formula for vitrifying radioactive waste, developed by a team of researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the Savannah River Technology Center, is expected to yield significantly higher melter throughput and higher waste loading (ratio of waste to frit), while maintaining adequate quality of the glass product.

Click here to download a TIFF image for pasting into presentations
PC Users: click on the link above with your right mouse button and select "save link as" or "save target as" to download image.
Mac Users: position your cursor on the link above, hold down the option key and click then select "save link as" or "save target as".

This link will take you to another page with further instructions.



Click here to download the original submitted image
PC Users: click on the link above with your right mouse button and select "save link as" or "save target as" to download image.
Mac Users: position your cursor on the link above, hold down the option key and click then select "save link as" or "save target as".

Document Title: Vitrification
Category: Environmental Remediation, Materials Science
Media Type: Photos
Date of Image/Photo: May 30, 2002
Background: A more efficient formula for vitrifying radioactive waste was developed by a team of researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the Savannah River Technology Center. By allowing more waste to be incorporated into each batch of glass and producing it faster, this new glass formula may significantly reduce the price tag attached to vitrifying waste, an integral part of cleaning up the nation's nuclear waste. Scientists at PNNL and SRTC studied the details of the glass-melting process and applied glass property models to develop a new frit (the glass-forming material used in vitrification). This frit is expected to yield significantly higher melter throughput and higher waste loading (ratio of waste to frit), while maintaining adequate quality of the glass product. The Defense Waste Processing Facility at the Savannah River Site is the largest waste vitrification plant in the world. There, highly radioactive waste is currently mixed with Frit 200, heated until they are molten, and poured into canisters. The canisters can then be disposed of in a federal geologic repository. Frit 200 produced excellent glass but was not optimized for quickly processing Savannah River's high-level waste sludge, meaning it took a long time for the waste and frit mixture to melt into glass. The new PNNL/SRTC formula (Frit 320) showed a melt rate 20% faster than the previous frit in small-scale melter tests. In addition, recent calculations and laboratory tests showed that the Savannah River Site sludge loading in Frit 320 might be significantly higher than in Frit 200, while maintaining all Defense Waste Processing Facility constraints. According to Savannah River's Bill Holtzscheiter, Immobilization Technology Integration Manager for the DOE's Tanks Focus Area, the life cycle costs savings will be significant. Each 10 percent improvement in the melt rate will save about $800 million. Each percent waste loading improvement will save about $300 million over the current baseline. According to PNNL task lead John Vienna, "This work is an excellent example of the benefits of working together in teams across laboratory boundaries. The impact of this change to Defense Waste Processing Facility operation will be a marked improvement in operating efficiency and waste loading--saving tax-payers money with low operational risk." Researchers on this project include John Vienna and Pavel Hrma from PNNL, and David Peeler and Mike Stone from SRTC. A more efficient formula for vitrifying radioactive waste was developed by a team of researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the Savannah River Technology Center. By allowing more waste to be incorporated into each batch of glass and producing it faster, this new glass formula may significantly reduce the price tag attached to vitrifying waste, an integral part of cleaning up the nation's nuclear waste. Scientists at PNNL and SRTC studied the details of the glass-melting process and applied glass property models to develop a new frit (the glass-forming material used in vitrification). This frit is expected to yield significantly higher melter throughput and higher waste loading (ratio of waste to frit), while maintaining adequate quality of the glass product. The Defense Waste Processing Facility at the Savannah River Site is the largest waste vitrification plant in the world. There, highly radioactive waste is currently mixed with Frit 200, heated until they are molten, and poured into canisters. The canisters can then be disposed of in a federal geologic repository. Frit 200 produced excellent glass but was not optimized for quickly processing Savannah River's high-level waste sludge, meaning it took a long time for the waste and frit mixture to melt into glass. The new PNNL/SRTC formula (Frit 320) showed a melt rate 20% faster than the previous frit in small-scale melter tests. In addition, recent calculations and laboratory tests showed that the Savannah River Site sludge loading in Frit 320 might be significantly higher than in Frit 200, while maintaining all Defense Waste Processing Facility constraints. According to Savannah River's Bill Holtzscheiter, Immobilization Technology Integration Manager for the U.S. Department of Energy's Tanks Focus Area, the life cycle costs savings will be significant. Each 10 percent improvement in the melt rate will save about $800 million. Each percent waste loading improvement will save about $300 million over the current baseline. According to PNNL task lead John Vienna, "This work is an excellent example of the benefits of working together in teams across laboratory boundaries. The impact of this change to Defense Waste Processing Facility operation will be a marked improvement in operating efficiency and waste loading--saving tax-payers money with low operational risk." Researchers on this project include John Vienna and Pavel Hrma from PNNL, and David Peeler and Mike Stone from SRTC. The DOE's Office of Environmental Management funded this work through the Tanks Focus Area, a national program that integrates the development and delivery of scientific and technical solutions for radioactive tank waste sites across the country.
URL of this page: http://picturethis.pnl.gov/picturet.nsf/by+id/AMER-5AST2Y

PICTURETHIS

BROWSE IMAGES BY

Other