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SOFT-LANDING -- Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers armed with a high-speed camera observed that ceramic bb's consistently rebounded about 8 percent of their dropped height from so-called fluffy ice grown at 40 Kelvin; the rebound on the much-higher-temperature ice people encounter on Earth, which is also much more compact, is 80 percent. This cushioning feature of extreme low-temperature ice is a key attribute in planet formation.

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Document Title: Sticky Ice
Category: Materials Science
Media Type: Photos
Date of Image/Photo: March 2005
Background:
URL of this page: http://picturethis.pnl.gov/picturet.nsf/by+id/AMER-6,CT74

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