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Self-Assembled Monolayers on Mesoporous Supports (SAMMS) materials can be obtained in several engineered forms, such as powders, beads, and extrudates, and can be coated with an endless variety of chemically active coatings. The coated SAMMS materials are useful in catalysis, separations, and controlled release applications. Depending on the coating, or the adsorbed species, the SAMMS materials can have different colors. In the background is a schematic drawing of the SAMMS structure, showing the hexagonally arranged pore channels, with a monolayer of coating and adsorbed metal ions.

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Document Title: Self-Assembled Monolayers on Mesoporous Supports (SAMMS)
Category: Environmental Remediation
Media Type: Photos
Date of Image/Photo: July 1998
Background: Self-Assembled Monolayers on Mesoporous Supports (SAMMS) is a "super sponge" for metals. It consists of mesoporous (silica) substrate with hexagonally ordered pore channels and monolayers of functional molecules packed close inside the pores. SAMMS is shown with a propylmercaptan monolayer where each terminal thiol group (yellow) binds one mercury ion (blue). Oxygen atoms are shown in red, carbon in gray, and hydrogen in white. By modifying the terminal group, SAMMS can be tailored to attract a wide range of metals. SAMMS won a 1998 R&D 100 Award and was a finalist in the 1998 Discover Awards.
URL of this page: http://picturethis.pnl.gov/picturet.nsf/by+id/AMER-6K2MRU

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