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Cesium ions (red) initially in oil (green) tend be sucked into the neighboring water (blue). PNNL for the first time measured that long-range aquatic attraction by balancing it against the attraction to a solid metal, represented by the gray bar at the far left.

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Document Title: Ion Choices
Category: Chemistry
Media Type: Graphics
Date of Image/Photo: Artwork by James Cowin, May 2009
Background: A team of scientists from Pennsylvania State University, Peking University, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted an experiment that, for the first time, confirms the accuracy of a simple, longstanding model of how ions behave at the interface of oil and water. The new information may give scientists more confidence in applying the "Born potential" to some of the complicated challenges in predicting ion transport near and through chemical and biological systems. For more information, see http://www.pnl.gov/science/highlights/highlight.asp?id=603
URL of this page: http://picturethis.pnl.gov/picturet.nsf/by+id/DRAE-7S7HXC

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