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Small chemical ornaments (cones) slow the release of anti-cancer antibodies (blue) from this functionalized mesoporous silica (orange). Artist's rendering; not to scale.

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Document Title: Anti-Cancer Antibodies
Category: Health-Related Research and Technologies
Media Type: Graphics
Date of Image/Photo: May 2010
Background: This image was created by PNNL staff member Mike Perkins. This image was NOT used in the Journal of the American Chemical Society publication. This image is available for use by the general public and other organizations. Packaging anti-cancer drugs into particles of chemically modified silica improve the drugs' ability to fight skin cancer in mice, according to new research. Results published May 3 in the Journal of the American Chemical Society online show the honeycombed particles can help anti-cancer antibodies prevent tumor growth and prolong the lives of mice. Anti-cancer antibodies are some of the most promising types of cancer therapies. The antibodies target a particular protein on cancer cells and — in a poorly understood way — kill off the cells. Examples include herceptin for one form of breast cancer and cetuximab for colon cancer. Unlike popping a pill, however, antibody-based treatments require patients to go in for intravenous drips into the arm. These sessions cost time and money, and expose healthy tissue to the antibody, causing side effects. Packaging antibodies into particles would concentrate them at the tumor and possibly reduce side effects. Other research has shown silicon to be well tolerated by cells, animals and people. So, in collaboration with tumor biologist Karl Erik Hellstrom's group at UW, the scientists explored particles made from material called mesoporous silica against cancer in mice.
URL of this page: http://picturethis.pnl.gov/picturet.nsf/by+id/DRAE-85MVSF

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